For example, if you suspect that the 2001 anthem, Also Sprach Zarathustra by Richard Strauss, has thematic importance, Phillips and Hill quote the composer explaining why he took his title from Nietzsche’s most well-known book: “I mean to convey in music an idea of the evolution of the human from its origin through the various phases of development, religious, as well as scientific, up to Nietzsche’s idea of the Ubermensch.” Strauss’s statement provides dimension for anyone considering a theme central not only to 2001 but to all of Kubrick’s work. The authors then add an interesting perception of their own when they write that the composer’s “vacillation” between the major and minor keys “suggests man’s perplexity at the sublime mysteries of nature.”
- Kubrick’s Hope: Discovering Optimism from 2001 to Eyes Wide Shut by Julian Rice
. . .

The indigenous societies of Melanesia were typically characterized by a “big man” political system in which individuals gained prestige through gift exchanges. The more wealth a man could distribute, the more people in his debt, and the greater his renown. Those who were unable to reciprocate were identified as “rubbish men”. Faced, through colonialism, with foreigners with a seemingly unending supply of goods for exchange, indigenous Melanesians experienced “value dominance”. That is, they were dominated by others in terms of their own (not the foreign) value system; exchange with foreigners left them feeling like Rubbish men.

— Cargo Cult on Wikipedia

. . .
I know you’re tired but come, this is the way.
- Rumi
. . .
Mythology is not a disease at all, though it may like all human things become diseased. You might as well say that thinking is a disease of the mind. It would be more near the truth to say that languages, especially modern European languages, are a disease of mythology. But Language cannot, all the same, be dismissed. The incarnate mind, the tongue, and the tale are in our world coeval. The human mind, endowed with the powers of generalization and abstraction, sees not only green-grass, discriminating it from other things (and finding it fair to look upon), but sees that it is green as well as being grass. But how powerful, how stimulating to the very faculty that produced it, was the invention of the adjective: no spell or incantation in Faerie is more potent. And that is not surprising: such incantations might indeed be said to be only another view of adjectives, a part of speech in a mythical grammar. The mind that thought of light, heavy, grey, yellow, still, swift, also conceived of magic that would make heavy things light and able to fly, turn grey lead into yellow gold, and the still rock into a swift water. If it could do the one, it could do the other; it inevitably did both. When we can take green from grass, blue from heaven, and red from blood, we have already an enchanter’s power — upon one plane; and the desire to wield that power in the world external to our minds awakes. It does not follow that we shall use that power well upon any plane. We may put a deadly green upon a man’s face and produce a horror; we may make the rare and terrible blue moon to shine; or we may cause woods to spring with silver leaves and rams to wear fleeces of gold, and put hot fire into the belly of the cold worm. But in such “fantasy,” as it is called, new form is made; Faerie begins; Man becomes a sub-creator.
- Max Müller
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Short film set in HK

. . .
Network (1976)

Network (1976)

(Source: wandrlust, via cinephilearchive)

. . .
. . .
I couldn’t make music on the beach. You know, I make music in my home, and I’ll tell you what my home is. My home is not just an apartment. I’ve been living in the same place for 38 years. My home is a device…a device for enabling creativity. A device for cutting out everything that - the chaos outside that people think is reality, that’s chaos. My home is a way of insulating myself and stripping all that away so I can get into what reality is for me, which is creativity.
- John Zorn

I couldn’t make music on the beach. You know, I make music in my home, and I’ll tell you what my home is. My home is not just an apartment. I’ve been living in the same place for 38 years. My home is a device…a device for enabling creativity. A device for cutting out everything that - the chaos outside that people think is reality, that’s chaos. My home is a way of insulating myself and stripping all that away so I can get into what reality is for me, which is creativity.
- John Zorn

. . .
'How loneliness goes', by Nguan

'How loneliness goes', by Nguan

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. . .

"We’ve seen it with children and that’s not happiness. That feeling of having to obey every impulse and gratify every desire seems to me to be a strange kind of slavery. Nobody talks about it as such though - it’s ‘freedom of choice’ and ‘you have the right to have things’ (…) and it works very well as a system for working an economy. The ways in which it does not work are much more difficult to talk about."

— David Foster Wallace

(Source: catastrofe)

. . .
Nam June Paik, TV Buddha (1974)

Nam June Paik, TV Buddha (1974)

(Source: oxane, via machomochi)

. . .
science:


Space Buddha
Ernst Schäfer was a good scientist and a good Nazi. In 1938-39 he led a German expedition to Tibet sponsored by SS leader Heinrich Himmler, who was fascinated by Aryan culture. Although Schäfer specialized in the study of birds, and indeed took many bird speciments with him back to Germany, the most extraordinary artifact turned out to be of extraterrestrial origin. When he or one of his expedition members discovered an ancient Buddhist statue with a swastika—the ancient Indian luck symbol adopted by the Nazis as their symbol and now tainted by their legacy—prominently displayed on the chest, they couldn’t help but bring it back. At least that is the most plausible explanation of how it came to Munich, where it was held in privately owned obscurity until it was auctioned off in 2009.
When scientists analyzed the statue last year, they found that it was carved from a meteoric fragment. The 10kg iron statue showed a composition indicating it came from an ataxite meteorite, the rarest kind of meteorite. It is believed to be 1,000 years old and depicts a Buddhist deity. It may have come from the Chinga meteorite, which fell near the border between Siberia and Mongolia ten to twenty thousand years ago.

science:

Space Buddha

Ernst Schäfer was a good scientist and a good Nazi. In 1938-39 he led a German expedition to Tibet sponsored by SS leader Heinrich Himmler, who was fascinated by Aryan culture. Although Schäfer specialized in the study of birds, and indeed took many bird speciments with him back to Germany, the most extraordinary artifact turned out to be of extraterrestrial origin. When he or one of his expedition members discovered an ancient Buddhist statue with a swastika—the ancient Indian luck symbol adopted by the Nazis as their symbol and now tainted by their legacy—prominently displayed on the chest, they couldn’t help but bring it back. At least that is the most plausible explanation of how it came to Munich, where it was held in privately owned obscurity until it was auctioned off in 2009.

When scientists analyzed the statue last year, they found that it was carved from a meteoric fragment. The 10kg iron statue showed a composition indicating it came from an ataxite meteorite, the rarest kind of meteorite. It is believed to be 1,000 years old and depicts a Buddhist deity. It may have come from the Chinga meteorite, which fell near the border between Siberia and Mongolia ten to twenty thousand years ago.

(via machomochi)

. . .

KUNG HONG KONG • a portrait of Kung Chi Shing

. . .

"We now have arrived to the end of our journey, We are wealthy with experience as we reach your isle, What Joy Pleasure and Gratitude we carry, With lofty thoughts and in spirit, We now sit with poseidon and cyclops, for Wisdom sought sees deceit no longer."

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