. . .

A remastered version of “Los Angeles Plays Itself” is currently showing at the Cinefamily theatre in Los Angeles - http://www.cinefamily.org/films/los-angeles-plays-itself/

. . .

Architectural critic Reyner Banham explores Los Angeles in this 1972 documentary.

. . .

Downtown Los Angeles

. . .

Work, Sex, Glory: A Tribute to Michael Glawogger

. . .

Zoe Tamerlis on drugs and sex in “Bad Lieutenant”

. . .

"Against magnificent settings, the characters play at intrigues and scandals. They cheat at cards and marriage, they fight ridiculous duels. This is a film with a backdrop of the Seven Years’ War that engulfed Europe, and it hardly seems to think the war worth noticing, except as a series of challenges posed for Barry Lyndon. By placing such small characters on such a big stage, by forcing our detachment from them, Kubrick supplies a philosophical position just as clearly as if he’d put speeches in his characters’ mouths."

— Roger Ebert, in his review of Barry Lyndon

. . .
For example, if you suspect that the 2001 anthem, Also Sprach Zarathustra by Richard Strauss, has thematic importance, Phillips and Hill quote the composer explaining why he took his title from Nietzsche’s most well-known book: “I mean to convey in music an idea of the evolution of the human from its origin through the various phases of development, religious, as well as scientific, up to Nietzsche’s idea of the Ubermensch.” Strauss’s statement provides dimension for anyone considering a theme central not only to 2001 but to all of Kubrick’s work. The authors then add an interesting perception of their own when they write that the composer’s “vacillation” between the major and minor keys “suggests man’s perplexity at the sublime mysteries of nature.”
- Kubrick’s Hope: Discovering Optimism from 2001 to Eyes Wide Shut by Julian Rice
. . .

The indigenous societies of Melanesia were typically characterized by a “big man” political system in which individuals gained prestige through gift exchanges. The more wealth a man could distribute, the more people in his debt, and the greater his renown. Those who were unable to reciprocate were identified as “rubbish men”. Faced, through colonialism, with foreigners with a seemingly unending supply of goods for exchange, indigenous Melanesians experienced “value dominance”. That is, they were dominated by others in terms of their own (not the foreign) value system; exchange with foreigners left them feeling like Rubbish men.

— Cargo Cult on Wikipedia

. . .
Mythology is not a disease at all, though it may like all human things become diseased. You might as well say that thinking is a disease of the mind. It would be more near the truth to say that languages, especially modern European languages, are a disease of mythology. But Language cannot, all the same, be dismissed. The incarnate mind, the tongue, and the tale are in our world coeval. The human mind, endowed with the powers of generalization and abstraction, sees not only green-grass, discriminating it from other things (and finding it fair to look upon), but sees that it is green as well as being grass. But how powerful, how stimulating to the very faculty that produced it, was the invention of the adjective: no spell or incantation in Faerie is more potent. And that is not surprising: such incantations might indeed be said to be only another view of adjectives, a part of speech in a mythical grammar. The mind that thought of light, heavy, grey, yellow, still, swift, also conceived of magic that would make heavy things light and able to fly, turn grey lead into yellow gold, and the still rock into a swift water. If it could do the one, it could do the other; it inevitably did both. When we can take green from grass, blue from heaven, and red from blood, we have already an enchanter’s power — upon one plane; and the desire to wield that power in the world external to our minds awakes. It does not follow that we shall use that power well upon any plane. We may put a deadly green upon a man’s face and produce a horror; we may make the rare and terrible blue moon to shine; or we may cause woods to spring with silver leaves and rams to wear fleeces of gold, and put hot fire into the belly of the cold worm. But in such “fantasy,” as it is called, new form is made; Faerie begins; Man becomes a sub-creator.
- Max Müller
. . .

Short film set in HK

. . .
Network (1976)

Network (1976)

(Source: wandrlust, via cinephiliabeyond)

. . .
. . .
I couldn’t make music on the beach. You know, I make music in my home, and I’ll tell you what my home is. My home is not just an apartment. I’ve been living in the same place for 38 years. My home is a device…a device for enabling creativity. A device for cutting out everything that - the chaos outside that people think is reality, that’s chaos. My home is a way of insulating myself and stripping all that away so I can get into what reality is for me, which is creativity.
- John Zorn

I couldn’t make music on the beach. You know, I make music in my home, and I’ll tell you what my home is. My home is not just an apartment. I’ve been living in the same place for 38 years. My home is a device…a device for enabling creativity. A device for cutting out everything that - the chaos outside that people think is reality, that’s chaos. My home is a way of insulating myself and stripping all that away so I can get into what reality is for me, which is creativity.
- John Zorn

. . .
'How loneliness goes', by Nguan

'How loneliness goes', by Nguan

. . .